Category Archives: Nursing News

Any news in the field of nursing, we will cover it. If there is news out there that nurses want to hear about, we will do our best to relay it to you.

California Kaiser Nurse Strike Cancelled

Follow Me

George Tall

Author at Hug Your Nurse
George Tall works in the legal field, is a father of three, and a husband of a RN for 25 years. He enjoys writing about everything, especially nursing! He has been writing for a living, at least partially, since around 2000. As an author on dozens of websites, he enjoys being factual, while spinning a bit of humor where possible.
Follow Me

Latest posts by George Tall (see all)

kaiser hospitalsWe recently reported on how nurses in California were set to strike against the Kaiser hospitals. That strike has been cancelled as the powerful nurse’s union and Kaiser have reached a deal. More than 18,000 nurses were going to strike in January of 2015. That move would have crippled the California Kaiser facilities, and it would have led to many clinics shutting down during the strike period.

The California Nurses Association/ National Nurses United said that they will not be striking on Wednesday and Thursday. More than 80 Kaiser facilities would have been affected in Central and Northern California.

They reached an agreement for Kaiser to hire hundreds of additional nurses to meet the growing demand and stress that was being placed on their current staff. Kaiser also agreed to increase their pay and to continue the pension plans. Most importantly to many, they will create a new advisory committee to oversee the overall standard of care.

This agreement still needs to be ratified, but it most likely will be.

Ohio Set To Ax School Nurses

Follow Me

George Tall

Author at Hug Your Nurse
George Tall works in the legal field, is a father of three, and a husband of a RN for 25 years. He enjoys writing about everything, especially nursing! He has been writing for a living, at least partially, since around 2000. As an author on dozens of websites, he enjoys being factual, while spinning a bit of humor where possible.
Follow Me

Latest posts by George Tall (see all)

school nursesThe Ohio State Board of Education is about to repeal the five of eight standard. That means that schools in Ohio will no longer be required, by law, to have one school nurse for every 1,000 students. Schools may, or may not, choose to have school nurses to attend to the student body’s needs.

This likely means that many school nurses around the state will be fired, or their positions will not be filled when the current nurse leaves. As school districts struggle over budget deficits and the needs to spend money in other areas such as technology, they can now decide to release their nurses and use their pay elsewhere.

This is alarming to many. Some of the duties that a school nurse performs includes:

  • Treating injured children- If a student has a cut, scrape or broken bone, the first line of treatment rests with the nurse.
  • Passing out medications- By law, every student’s prescribed medication must be securely stored, by state law. It is the school nurse who is assigned the role of storing those meds, and making sure that the kids take them. As roughly 15% of students are on some type of prescribed medicine, this is a very important job.
  • Immunizations- One role of the school nurse is to make sure that the kids keep up with their required immunizations. They check their records to make sure that they are current, and work with the parents when they see that immunizations are needed.
  • Support- School nurses not only provide physical aide where it is needed, they also provide a level of emotional support. When a child is having problems, and emotionally unstable, it is the school nurse that they often turn to for assistance.

 

Of course this appeal of the current laws does not mean that they will all be fired, but each school and school district will now have the ability to release them as they see fit. Hopefully, most (if not all) of the schools realize the important role that the nurses play in their students’ lives.

Tuscaloosa CNA Arrested for Punching 93 Year Old Patient

Follow Me

George Tall

Author at Hug Your Nurse
George Tall works in the legal field, is a father of three, and a husband of a RN for 25 years. He enjoys writing about everything, especially nursing! He has been writing for a living, at least partially, since around 2000. As an author on dozens of websites, he enjoys being factual, while spinning a bit of humor where possible.
Follow Me

Latest posts by George Tall (see all)

glen haven health and rehab alabamaAnita Brenett Watford, a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA), in Tuscaloosa, Alabama was arrested on January 8, 2015. She allegedly punched a 93 year old female patient in the face.

The act of violence allegedly occurred on October 31, 2014 at the Glen Haven Health and Rehabilitation just outside of Tuscaloosa, in nearby Northport. CNA Watford was arrested just after the event, but she was able to post a $10,000 bond to be released.

Last week, Watford was indicted for punching the elderly patient in the face, and then she was arrested. She was indicted for a violation of the Adult Protective Services Act that became law in 1976.

Why did she punch the lady? Because the patient was spitting her medicine out that Watford was giving her. Watford claims that she was simply trying to restrain the senior patient, but eyewitnesses claim otherwise. If she is convicted at trial, we will be found guilty of a Class C felony because her acts caused actual physical harm.

Watford is set to enter her plea at court on April 3, 2015. Her appearance will be at the Tuscaloosa County Circuit in front of Judge James Roberts.

Shame on you Anita Watford of Tuscaloosa! People like you are a disgrace to the healthcare profession, and humanity in general. I wonder how your fellow inmates will fell about you beating up a grandma?

 

Nurse Cafferkey Recovering From Ebola, No Longer Critically Ill

Follow Me

George Tall

Author at Hug Your Nurse
George Tall works in the legal field, is a father of three, and a husband of a RN for 25 years. He enjoys writing about everything, especially nursing! He has been writing for a living, at least partially, since around 2000. As an author on dozens of websites, he enjoys being factual, while spinning a bit of humor where possible.
Follow Me

Latest posts by George Tall (see all)

nurse pauline cafferkey ebolaPauline Cafferkey, the Scottish nurse that was the first person to be diagnosed with Ebola in the UK, has been taken off of the critical condition list, as announced by the London Royal Free Hospital. She was being treated at the London hospital’s intensive care unit for nearly two weeks. While her situation was touch-and-go for many days, it appears that she has crossed the hurdle and is on the road to a full recovery.

Her treatments for Ebola involved the use of plasma from people that have recovered from the virus. She was also treated with an experimental antiviral medication. Since the treatments have become effective in her case, the hospital announced that she is, “showing signs of improvement and is no longer critically ill.”

Nurse Cafferky was first admitted to the hospital in Glasgow on December 29, 2014. She was returning from Sierra Leone to her home in Scotland. She was a healthcare volunteer in the West Africa country that was helping to stop the spread of the Ebola virus.

While no antiviral drugs for Ebola have been approved for general use or sale by the FDA or its European equivalent. Doctors across the globe are currently experimenting with several drugs that are not approved for sale yet.

Over 8,000 people have died from the recent 2014-2015 outbreak of Ebola in Africa. While there have been a few spot cases of the virus detected in Europe and North America, so far all of those cases are from people (primarily healthcare workers) traveling from Africa.

We’re so happy to hear of your improvements nurse Cafferky, and we wish you a speedy full recovery!

nurse strike california 2015

18,000 Kaiser Nurses In California Going On Strike January 2015

Follow Me

George Tall

Author at Hug Your Nurse
George Tall works in the legal field, is a father of three, and a husband of a RN for 25 years. He enjoys writing about everything, especially nursing! He has been writing for a living, at least partially, since around 2000. As an author on dozens of websites, he enjoys being factual, while spinning a bit of humor where possible.
Follow Me

Latest posts by George Tall (see all)

nurse strike california 2015More than 18,000 nurses working in Kaiser hospitals and clinics in California are planning a strike on January 21-22, 2015. The plan for the two day northern and central California strike was announced by the California Nurse Association. Healthcare workers hitting the picket line in California is a fairly common event, but the magnitude of this strike is alarming.

With thousands of workers going on strike, the clinics and hospitals will not be able to function. It’s likely that some will attempt to stay open by hiring temporary nurses and “strike nurses”, but it’s unlikely that they will be able to locate anywhere near 18,000 for a two day period.

Their chief complaints are that:

  • Services have been slashed at the Kaiser facilities.
  • Many patients that need to remain in the hospital for treatments are being sent home early to save money.
  • There isn’t enough training, equipment or resources to properly treat their patients.

The nurse union in California is a powerful tool that is used in CA to influence medical facilities and the regulatory agencies. Their union is so strong that a mere threat of a strike can lead to rapid changes. It is unknown if this strike will occur in mere days, but looking at other similar actions in the area, it appears very likely. A similar strike occurred towards the end of 2014 in California over ebola measures.

Are you a nurse in California that works for Kaiser? Do you have any knowledge of this impending strike? We would love to hear from you for a better explanation of the reasoning behind it. We would also like to know what this will mean for the patients, both in the hospitals where they are residing, and in the clinics where they are seeking treatments. Your comment would be greatly appreciated.